BodyCard Login

What is culture?

PDFPrintE-mail

argaiv1284

What is culture?

Of the more than 100 definitions of culture, we like this one best:

Culture is an integrated system of learned behavior patterns that are characteristic of the members of any given society.  Culture refers to the total way of life of particular groups of people.  It includes everything that a group of people thinks, says, does and makes, its customs, language, material artifacts and shared systems of attitudes and feelings.  Culture is learned and transmitted from generation to generation.

Culture (from the Latin cultura stemming from colere, meaning "to cultivate")[1] is a term that has different meanings. For example, in 1952, Alfred Kroeber and Clyde Kluckhohn compiled a list of 164 definitions of "culture" in Culture: A Critical Review of Concepts and Definitions.[2] However, the word "culture" is most commonly used in three basic senses:
  • excellence of taste in the fine arts and humanities
  • an integrated pattern of human knowledge, belief, and behavior that depends upon the capacity for symbolic thought and social learning
  • the set of shared attitudes, values, goals, and practices that characterizes an institution, organization or group.
When the concept first emerged in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Europe, it connoted a process of cultivation or improvement, as in agriculture or horticulture. In the nineteenth century, it came to refer first to the betterment or refinement of the individual, especially through education, and then to the fulfillment of national aspirations or ideals. In the mid-nineteenth century, some scientists used the term "culture" to refer to a universal human capacity.

In the twentieth century, "culture" emerged as a concept central to anthropology, encompassing all human phenomena that are not purely results of human genetics. Specifically, the term "culture" in American anthropology had two meanings: (1) the evolved human capacity to classify and represent experiences with symbols, and to act imaginatively and creatively; and (2) the distinct ways that people living in different parts of the world classified and represented their experiences, and acted creatively. Following World War II, the term became important, albeit with different meanings, in other disciplines such as sociology, cultural studies, organizational psychology and management studies.

L. Robert Kohls, Survival Kit For Overseas Living, Systran Publications,

Sign up and Receive 10% Off your next purchase!

Follow BodyLanguageCards

Buy on our site or check out with BodyLanguage Cards directly on Amazon

Buy Now

Who's Online

We have 774 guests online